Word of the Year for 2012. 2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others. We got serious in 2013. Edward Snowden’s reveal of Project PRISM to the arrival of Google Glass.

Spoiler alert: Things don’t get less serious in 2014. Ebola virus outbreak, shocking acts of violence both abroad and in the US, and widespread theft of personal information. From the pervading sense of vulnerability surrounding Ebola to the visibility into acts of crime or misconduct that ignited critical conversations about race, gender, and violence, various senses of exposure were out in the open this year. Racial identity also held a lot of debate in 2015, after Rachel Dolezal, a white woman presenting herself as a black woman, said she identified as biracial or transracial. Fear of the «other» was a huge theme in 2016, from Brexit to President Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric. Despite being chosen as the 2016 Word of the Year, xenophobia is not to be celebrated.

Rather it’s a word to reflect upon deeply in light of the events of the recent past. 2017 about those who spoke out against powerful figures and institutions and about those who stayed silent. It was a year of real awakening to complicity in various sectors of society, from politics to pop culture. Our choice for Word of the Year is as much about what is visible as it is about what is not. It’s a word that reminds us that even inaction is a type of action. The silent acceptance of wrongdoing is how we’ve gotten to this point. We must not let this continue to be the norm.

If we do, then we are all complicit. What The Nog: What’s Eggnog? Who’s to Blame for English Spelling? Sign up for our Newsletter! Start your day with weird words, fun quizzes, and language stories. This iframe contains the logic required to handle Ajax powered Gravity Forms.

Your browser will redirect to your requested content shortly. Either we’re getting old and grouchy or Facebook is becoming a lot less tolerable these days. Here are the 20 most annoying behaviors in your News Feed. Either we’re getting old and grouchy or Facebook is becoming a lot less tolerable these days. Click Here to find out more. The Mashable Velocity graph shows how quickly people are sharing this article on the social Web. We love your babies, really we do.

We do not, however, relish vivid descriptions of their every wee wee and poopee. And we especially don’t look forward to 46 similar posts every single day. Congratulations, you have a job! So does the majority of the rest of the 900 million people on Facebook. We simply ask one favor: If you wish to market, create a marketing page. If you wish to lose all your friends, keep spamming them with P90X ads.

Urban Dictionary defines «vaguebooking» as the following: «An intentionally vague Facebook status update that prompts friends to ask what’s going on, or is possibly a cry for help. I really don’t think anyone cares about our third trip to Dunkin’ Donuts this week. Sometimes I wish I wasn’t 5’10» and stunningly gorgeous because then I could just walk in peace. We appreciate a good tune now and again. But somehow, reading your ass-random song lyrics out of context doesn’t toot our trumpet, if you know what I mean. FWIW, Twitter is not the same as FB. There’s a reason people on Facebook discontinued the third person status update. I am not in that sunset picture, but you seem to want me to be. Or you just want me to hate you. Variation: Any post that ends with «Amirite? Any post that ends with «Amirite? It’s so refreshing to know that people subscribe to you for your intelligence and wit. Oh right, that and marriage proposals.